Namibia Through My Lens

Words and Photographs by Gero Lilleike

dsc_1172

With sand stretching as far as your imagination can wonder, the Namib Desert’s allure is difficult to resist. It’s the oldest desert in the world, eerily desolate and immeasurably beautiful. I recently spent six days in Namibia, exploring the coast, the dunes and the desert and the experience was hugely enjoyable.

Namibia, the land of open spaces, is so large and diverse and I have attempted to capture the magnitude of what Namibia has to offer those who visit it. I hope these images will inspire and motivate you to pack your bags and travel into the unknown. Enjoy!

1. The Namib Desert

The allure of the Namib Desert is one of the main reasons why so many people love Namibia. It’s a humbling and grounding place that forces you to reflect on your life. It’s a special place.

dsc_1461

This photograph was taken in the late afternoon in the dune belt in the vicinity of the well-known Dune 7 near Walvis Bay. The dune belts in this area are home to massive sand dunes. However, much larger sand dunes are to be found in southern Namibia at Sossusvlei, where you will find a dune aptly named ‘Big Daddy’, standing at least 325 metres high. Good luck climbing that one!

2. Swakopmund 

If it’s fine German cuisine and beer you’re after, then Swakopmund is definitely the place to fill your belly and quench your thirst after a long day in the desert. Swakopmund is situated on the Atlantic coast some 280 km west of Windhoek, Namibia’s capital city.

20161003_083712-01-1

Nearly 45 000 people call Swakopmund home and the German colonial town was founded in 1892 as the main harbour for what was known as the German South-West Africa (1884-1915), now called Namibia. The German translation for Swakopmund is “Mouth of the Swakop”, which refers to the Swakop River mouth found south of the town. Many of the buildings showcase fine German architecture and there’s lots to see and do in town. But first, have a beer!

3. Willys Jeep in the Desert

Somewhere in the Namib Desert, in a dune belt known as Rooibank, lies a fascinating piece of steel. Don’t ask me exactly where it is because I wouldn’t be able to tell you, but it’s out there, somewhere.

20160929_193608

This is a photograph of what’s believed to be an iconic Willys Jeep, or what’s left of it, in the middle of absolutely nowhere. From what I was told by a local guide, the vehicle broke down in the desert decades ago and was never recovered. What intrigues me about this photograph is how the desert reduces and reclaims what was, whether it be a living being or even a car. I love how the steering wheel trim is hanging on for dear life. I can’t help but question how this car could be reduced to this? The answer still eludes me. Many, many years in the desert I suppose…

4. Shipwreck Zeila, Skeleton Coast

Between Swakopmund and Henties Bay on the Skeleton Coast is another fine example of nature reclaiming a man-made object. In this case, the victim was a fishing trawler named Zeila that got stranded on August 25, 2008. It’s one of many shipwrecks to be found on the Skeleton Coast.

dsc_1255

As the story goes, Zeila was a scrap vessel bound for Bombay, India, but it came loose from its towing line near Walvis Bay and drifted north to its final resting place. I was told by locals that it took several hours for authorities to locate the missing vessel as the incident happened under the cover of night and it was only discovered once it finally ran aground. The Zeila is now home to hundreds of seabirds that use its decaying shell as a nesting site. Notice the barreling wave in the foreground…

5. Goanikontes Oasis, Namib-Naukluft National Park

The Namib-Naukluft National Park is the largest game park in Africa and the fourth largest in the world. Within the park, and some 40 km east of Swakopmund, is an area known as the ‘Moon Landscape’. The darker tones of this Damara Granite landscape gives it its name and it formed some 460-500 million years ago. Goanikontes Oasis is tucked away in the ‘Moon Valley’ and is found alongside the now dry Swakop riverbed.

dsc_1396

The name Goanikontes is of Nama origin, meaning ‘The place where you can remove your fur coat’. Historically, Goanikontes was a rest stop for people travelling from Walvis bay and Swakopmund to Windhoek.  In the 1750’s the Swakop River served as an oasis for the Herero and Nama tribes and it was the perfect place to raise and feed cattle. Later on, in 1849, the first white settlers arrived and proceeded to trade cattle with the local tribes. The fertile soil on the banks of the Swakop River also made for good crop farming, with the produce sold in Walvis Bay and Swakopmund.

My family has history in Goanikontes Oasis and the area has particular relevance to me since my late grandmother lived and farmed the land there. But, alas, that’s a story for another day.

Goanikontes is a great place to visit if you happen to be in the area. The historical farmhouse was built in 1903 and is now a restaurant, serving cold beer and delicious meals. It’s well worth a look-see, and another beer.

6. Surfing in Namibia

I like to leave the best for last.

Apart from sand, Namibia also has waves in abundance and if you’re a surfer, with an adventurous spirit, then there’s a wave in Namibia with your name on it. Namibia was, and still is, a largely unexplored surfing destination and with the discovery of the now-famous Donkey Bay a few years back, surfers regularly flock to Namibia to experience the magical wave that is the Donkey.

dsc_0961

Many surfers consider Donkey Bay to be the most perfect wave in the world, and if you consider the ridiculously long tube rides surfers have scored there, they can only be right. There is no other wave on the planet that gives a surfer so much time behind the curtain. Sure, Donkey Bay is awesome when it’s cranking and looking at the photograph above, it’s enough to make any surfer’s knees buckle with stoke. Or is it?

This photograph was taken at my ‘secret spot’ in Namibia and no, you can’t find it on Google Maps!

Go find your own wave…

Also read:

Namibia in Pictures
The Leatherfoot Fish Project – Building a Wood Surfboard
Winter Surfing in Cape Town
Surfing in Elands Bay
Surfing in Muizenberg
Choosing the right surfboard with Dutchie Surf Designs

 

Advertisements

Things to do in Cape Town

Cape Town glistens in the morning light.  Photo: Gero Lilleike

Cape Town glistens in the morning light. Photo: Gero Lilleike

Words and Photographs by Gero Lilleike

There’s no excuse for being bored in Cape Town and if you are, you’re either lazy, or poor. Great things lie beyond your doorstep, but don’t forget your wallet on your way out. Everyone is different and there’s lots to do if you are open to the experience, Cape Town has something for everyone. I decided to step-out and discover what Cape Town has to offer and this is what I found. Here are six things to consider doing when visiting the Mother City.

Go Surf

Cape Town offers countless surf spots to satisfy your surfing needs, whether you’re an advanced surfer or a beginner, it doesn’t matter, there’s a wave for every kind of surfer. Surfing in Muizenberg is probably your best bet if you are new to surfing and there are numerous surf shops and places to rent surfboards. The wave at Muizenberg is also very forgiving but you will have to contend with crowds, especially on weekends. If you are an intermediate or advanced surfer you may want to take a drive to Kommetjie or Noordhoek for a more exciting ride or explore less crowded spots along the coast, the choice is yours. Surfing is a great option if you are keen for a bit of adventure and the best part of it is that it’s a relatively cheap activity that won’t leave a dent in your wallet.

Gero Lilleike surfing in Muizenberg. Photo: Gero Lilleike

Gero Lilleike surfing in Muizenberg. Photo: Gero Lilleike


Climb Table Mountain

You can’t say that you’ve experienced Cape Town until you have scaled Table Mountain, so why not do it? If hiking is up your alley then this is a great way to conquer Table Mountain but be sure to do your research beforehand and pay attention to the weather as conditions can change in the blink of an eye. If you are looking for the easy way up, then the Table Mountain Aerial Cableway is at your service. Once at the top, Table Mountain will provide breathtaking views of the whole city and will probably leave a lump in your throat. Either way, Table Mountain is there to be conquered and you should seriously consider it.

 

Table Mountain in all its glory. Photo: Gero Lilleike

Table Mountain in all its glory. Photo: Gero Lilleike


Visit the V&A Waterfront

The V&A Waterfront in Cape Town is a popular hangout for locals and tourists alike and offers a plethora of activities for the whole family, from food, shopping, boat trips and daily entertainment, there’s always something to do here. The V&A Waterfront is also home to the Two Oceans Aquarium which allows you to get up close and personal with the wonders of the ocean and should be high on your priority list when you make your visit. There are various boat rides available to you and they provide a unique perspective on Cape Town. My personal suggestion is to book a ride on the Jolly Roger Pirate Ship which makes for a fun boat trip out to sea, especially if you have children.

The Jolly Roger Pirate Ship at the V&A Waterfront. Photo: Gero Lilleike

The Jolly Roger Pirate Ship at the V&A Waterfront. Photo: Gero Lilleike

Drive Chapman’s Peak

If you are keen for some spectacular Cape scenery, then all you have to do is get in your car and take a drive along Chapman’s Peak Drive, you won’t be disappointed. There are many spots along the way where you can stop and soak in the scenery, just be sure to have your camera ready to snap all the special moments. Chapman’s Peak offers awesome views of Hout Bay and Noordhoek Beach, but remember this is a toll road so there is a fee to use this section of road. If you don’t want to drive then feel free to use your legs and walk or you can tackle the hills with your bicycle. Chapman’s Peak is definitely a must-do activity if you are in Cape Town so be sure to check it out.

Chapman's Peak Drive, Cape Town, South Africa. Photo: Gero Lilleike

Chapman’s Peak Drive, Cape Town, South Africa. Photo: Gero Lilleike

Walk Cape Point

If you are in Cape Town, do yourself a favor and visit Cape Point. Cape Point forms part of the Table Mountain National Park and offers great walks with stunning scenery to keep you company. Cape Point is the most south-western point of the African continent and was named the ‘Cape of Storms’ by Bartolomeu Dias who navigated it in 1488. Be sure to make your way up to the lighthouse which was erected in 1859 and stands some 249m above sea-level. A second, more effective lighthouse was erected in 1914 and stands only 87m above sea level and is the most powerful lighthouse on the South African coastline. There are many viewpoints which offer stomach-churning views of the cliffs and ocean below, so tread carefully here.

Cape Point, Cape Town, South Africa. Photo: Gero Lilleike

Cape Point, Cape Town, South Africa. Photo: Gero Lilleike

Have a beer in Kalk Bay

Apart from offering an arty shopping experience, Kalk Bay also offers superb dining options overlooking Kalk Bay Harbour and False Bay, the perfect place to kick back and relax. As an avid beer drinker and lover of seafood, I recommend you pay a visit to the Brass Bell which serves delicious seafood meals and has enough beer to quench the biggest beer thirst. To make the deal that much better, you have the ocean by your side and if you’re lucky enough you may even spot a whale or two breaching offshore. Kalk Bay also offers a pretty good wave when conditions are right so you might want to keep your surfboard handy in case the ocean plays it’s part, but remember, don’t surf if you have beer in your belly.

The Brass Bell, Kalk Bay, Cape Town, South Africa. Photo: Gero Lilleike

The Brass Bell, Kalk Bay, Cape Town, South Africa. Photo: Gero Lilleike