Winter Surfing in Cape Town

wave at Long Beach Cape Town

An empty wave slips past unridden at Long Beach, Cape Town. Photo: Gero Lilleike

Words and Photographs by Gero Lilleike

Winter surfing in Cape Town is by far the best time for surfers to suit-up and ride waves. The water is ice cold and it’s usually raining, but on the up side, the dreaded South Easter is mostly dead and perfect offshore winds prevail most of the time, depending on the break. The best waves are known to grace the Mother City during the Winter months thanks to regular low pressure systems sweeping across South Africa.

So, when the first proper, large, winter swell of the year hit the weather charts around Cape Town last week, surfers everywhere went mentally haywire. On the one end of the surfing scale, there were a few big wave surfers piling into boats with tow-in crews revving their jetski’s in Hout Bay Harbour, ready to surf mountains in privacy at Dungeons. And on the other end of the scale, you had everybody else, myself included, piling into the sea to surf mountains at Muizenberg and Long Beach. With my GoPro in hand, I set my sights on the sea and paddled out into the chaos.

Surfing in Muizenberg

Surfing in Muizenberg is almost always a crowded experience, even more so when there is fresh Winter goodness pulsing into Surfer’s Corner. Unsurprisingly, I arrived to find at least 300 surfers waiting to scratch onto the next wave that appeared on the horizon. It was low tide and by the looks of it the swell was still filling in and a clean 2-3ft Muizies freight train was on the cards.

Surfing Muizenberg

Riding giants in Muizenberg, Cape Town. Photo: Gero Lilleike

Although Muizenberg is super crowded most of the time, it’s often exaggerated by the fact that it’s such a big lineup and everyone just spreads out, making it bearable on most days and thankfully I managed to catch a few chilled waves of my own. Later that day, the swell whipped up into a frenzy of meaty walls and the incoming tide extended the paddle-out by what felt like a couple hundred metres. The wind was offshore with clouds brewing on the mountain and the waves just kept rolling in for everyone’s enjoyment. Surfing in Muizenberg is like that. On its bad days it makes you feel like going back to work and on the good days it makes you feel like you surfing in heaven.

Surfing at Long Beach

Two days┬álater, Muizenberg went flat and I had a sneaky suspicion that Long Beach in Kommetjie might still be picking up some nice leftover swell. I was right, but an army was surfing there too. Long Beach differs from Muizenberg in the sense that the lineup, or zone for catching waves is much smaller, so like always, when it’s crowded, it’s really crowded and you have to fight for your waves. Consider yourself a winner if you get a Long Beach wave all to yourself.

Surfing Long Beach Cape Town

Surfing a fun wave at Long Beach, Kommetjie, Cape Town. Photo: Gero Lilleike

The wave at Long Beach is a bit more punchy compared to Muizenberg, especially on the inside section and it can be a really fast and fun ride when the swell is a bit bigger. I joined the army of surfers in the water with clean 3-5ft waves washing our sins away. It took a while to get a wave but perseverance paid off and when that wave came along, it was good. I decided to beat the crowds and do a bit of bodysurfing in the shorebreak to end my session, which actually turned out be loads of fun.

Across the ocean, Dungeons was alive with moving mountains of water pounding the Sentinel senseless. The sound of Jetski’s revving filled my ears, somewhere there, a wave was being ridden.

Long Beach Cape Town

The scene at Long Beach in Cape Town. Photo: Gero Lilleike

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Things to do in Cape Town

Cape Town glistens in the morning light.  Photo: Gero Lilleike

Cape Town glistens in the morning light. Photo: Gero Lilleike

Words and Photographs by Gero Lilleike

There’s no excuse for being bored in Cape Town and if you are, you’re either lazy, or poor. Great things lie beyond your doorstep, but don’t forget your wallet on your way out. Everyone is different and there’s lots to do if you are open to the experience, Cape Town has something for everyone. I decided to step-out and discover what Cape Town has to offer and this is what I found. Here are six things to consider doing when visiting the Mother City.

Go Surf

Cape Town offers countless surf spots to satisfy your surfing needs, whether you’re an advanced surfer or a beginner, it doesn’t matter, there’s a wave for every kind of surfer. Surfing in Muizenberg is probably your best bet if you are new to surfing and there are numerous surf shops and places to rent surfboards. The wave at Muizenberg is also very forgiving but you will have to contend with crowds, especially on weekends. If you are an intermediate or advanced surfer you may want to take a drive to Kommetjie or Noordhoek for a more exciting ride or explore less crowded spots along the coast, the choice is yours. Surfing is a great option if you are keen for a bit of adventure and the best part of it is that it’s a relatively cheap activity that won’t leave a dent in your wallet.

Gero Lilleike surfing in Muizenberg. Photo: Gero Lilleike

Gero Lilleike surfing in Muizenberg. Photo: Gero Lilleike


Climb Table Mountain

You can’t say that you’ve experienced Cape Town until you have scaled Table Mountain, so why not do it? If hiking is up your alley then this is a great way to conquer Table Mountain but be sure to do your research beforehand and pay attention to the weather as conditions can change in the blink of an eye. If you are looking for the easy way up, then the Table Mountain Aerial Cableway is at your service. Once at the top, Table Mountain will provide breathtaking views of the whole city and will probably leave a lump in your throat. Either way, Table Mountain is there to be conquered and you should seriously consider it.

 

Table Mountain in all its glory. Photo: Gero Lilleike

Table Mountain in all its glory. Photo: Gero Lilleike


Visit the V&A Waterfront

The V&A Waterfront in Cape Town is a popular hangout for locals and tourists alike and offers a plethora of activities for the whole family, from food, shopping, boat trips and daily entertainment, there’s always something to do here. The V&A Waterfront is also home to the Two Oceans Aquarium which allows you to get up close and personal with the wonders of the ocean and should be high on your priority list when you make your visit. There are various boat rides available to you and they provide a unique perspective on Cape Town. My personal suggestion is to book a ride on the Jolly Roger Pirate Ship which makes for a fun boat trip out to sea, especially if you have children.

The Jolly Roger Pirate Ship at the V&A Waterfront. Photo: Gero Lilleike

The Jolly Roger Pirate Ship at the V&A Waterfront. Photo: Gero Lilleike

Drive Chapman’s Peak

If you are keen for some spectacular Cape scenery, then all you have to do is get in your car and take a drive along Chapman’s Peak Drive, you won’t be disappointed. There are many spots along the way where you can stop and soak in the scenery, just be sure to have your camera ready to snap all the special moments. Chapman’s Peak offers awesome views of Hout Bay and Noordhoek Beach, but remember this is a toll road so there is a fee to use this section of road. If you don’t want to drive then feel free to use your legs and walk or you can tackle the hills with your bicycle. Chapman’s Peak is definitely a must-do activity if you are in Cape Town so be sure to check it out.

Chapman's Peak Drive, Cape Town, South Africa. Photo: Gero Lilleike

Chapman’s Peak Drive, Cape Town, South Africa. Photo: Gero Lilleike

Walk Cape Point

If you are in Cape Town, do yourself a favor and visit Cape Point. Cape Point forms part of the Table Mountain National Park and offers great walks with stunning scenery to keep you company. Cape Point is the most south-western point of the African continent and was named the ‘Cape of Storms’ by Bartolomeu Dias who navigated it in 1488. Be sure to make your way up to the lighthouse which was erected in 1859 and stands some 249m above sea-level. A second, more effective lighthouse was erected in 1914 and stands only 87m above sea level and is the most powerful lighthouse on the South African coastline. There are many viewpoints which offer stomach-churning views of the cliffs and ocean below, so tread carefully here.

Cape Point, Cape Town, South Africa. Photo: Gero Lilleike

Cape Point, Cape Town, South Africa. Photo: Gero Lilleike

Have a beer in Kalk Bay

Apart from offering an arty shopping experience, Kalk Bay also offers superb dining options overlooking Kalk Bay Harbour and False Bay, the perfect place to kick back and relax. As an avid beer drinker and lover of seafood, I recommend you pay a visit to the Brass Bell which serves delicious seafood meals and has enough beer to quench the biggest beer thirst. To make the deal that much better, you have the ocean by your side and if you’re lucky enough you may even spot a whale or two breaching offshore. Kalk Bay also offers a pretty good wave when conditions are right so you might want to keep your surfboard handy in case the ocean plays it’s part, but remember, don’t surf if you have beer in your belly.

The Brass Bell, Kalk Bay, Cape Town, South Africa. Photo: Gero Lilleike

The Brass Bell, Kalk Bay, Cape Town, South Africa. Photo: Gero Lilleike

The Steve Erwin Interview – The Wave Hunter

The Kalk Bay Express by Steve Erwin

The Kalk Bay Express by Steve Erwin

Meet Steve Erwin! Now I know what you thinking. Steve Erwin, the crocodile hunter? No, Steve Erwin, the surfer, the legend. As the fires of industry burned on in Johannesburg, a young soul stirred. Having tasted the fruit the ocean bears, the waves beckoned him closer, and closer. Steve discovered surfing, and this jewel of a find has not only made Steve who he is today but has also led to the creation of some pretty cool surf art and shirt designs. Steve’s a talented man and I wanted to find out more about what he does and how he spreads his paint.

[GL] So Steve, tell us a bit about yourself? What’s your deal?

[SE] I’m an entrepreneur living in Cape Town and have been working as a freelance graphic and interior designer. For the past two years I have also been working on my own clothing label called Stencilworx. I was born and bred in Johannesburg but decided that the big land-locked city was not on my vibe. Having discovered surfing while living in Joburg, I decided that Cape Town was where I wanted to live and I have been in Cape Town for four years already.

[GL] That’s a brave move Steve. Please tell us more about Stencilworx?

[SE] As a promising illustrator and designer, I created graphics to print onto shirts but soon discovered that screen printing was not a viable option for me. After experimenting with different printing techniques, I discovered that hand-cut stencils solved a lot of printing problems. This developed into what is now known as the Stencilworx brand, which utilises stencils as the main focus for printing.

Some Stencilworx Examples

Some Stencilworx Examples


[GL] What makes Stencilworx unique?

[SE] The stencils are hand-cut and the clothing is hand-printed, offering limited runs and a customer-specific product. Each product has a personalised touch and no two items are ever the same and every item is unique.

[GL] What other techniques do you use and what other art do you create?

[SE] I experiment with pencil and ink drawings combined with water colour and computer rendering to produce my artwork. I also experiment with various other illustrations and paintings but I pretty much draw, paint and print whatever inspires me at a particular time.

Demonic Surfer

Demonic Surfer


[GL]
On the subject of inspiration, where do you draw your inspiration from to create your art?

[SE] Much of my inspiration comes from surfing and surf culture, but also from life, experiences, books and watching too much WWE (laughs).

[GL] Interesting, but how did you get into surfing?

[SE] I was driving home from university one day and came across a pawn shop in Troyeville, Johannesburg, that was selling a surfboard for R30. It was an ancient 6’6 Andrew Carter, not much of a surfboard, more like a plank, but I couldn’t resist buying it. I learnt to surf in Kasouga in the Eastern Cape and as many of my friends caught onto surfing, surf trips became a ritual at every opportunity that presented itself. Seven-years later, I live in Cape Town and I’m a surf instructor at the Surf Shack in Muizenberg, so surfing has been part of my life ever since.

Surf Shack Surfer's Vest by Steve Erwin

Surf Shack Surfer’s Vest by Steve Erwin


[GL] That’ a great story Steve, I can relate, because I learnt to surf with you and we went on many surf trips together. But tell us, where have you surfed and what is your favorite wave in South Africa?

[SE] My surfing adventures have taken me to Durban, the South Coast, the Wild Coast (Transkei), Port Alfred in the Eastern Cape, the Southern Cape, the Cape Peninsula and the West Coast. Of all these places, as a goofy footer with a appetite for crayfish and sleeping in a tent, I would have to say that Elands Bay is the place that holds fond memories for me. However, I enjoy surfing in Muizenberg too and I love it for its own reasons.

[GL] Nice. What surfboards are you riding at the moment?

[SE] I am currently riding a 6’4 thruster but also ride a 7’6 mini-mal from time to time. I also have a 6’6 thruster that I use regularly as well as a old-school Mike Larmont single fin that I use for special occasions.

Mirrors

Mirrors


[GL] And now for the most important question of all, I’ve left the best for last, do you have a girlfriend?

[SE] (Laughs) No, I am currently single but I am willing to entertain any ladies who are intrigued by this interview.

[GL] Well I hope that works out for you Steve and wish you all the best in everything you do, I look forward to surfing with you again…(laughs).

[SE] Thanks for your interest in my endeavors and hope to see you in the water soon, ciao.

If you are interested in Stencilworx, visit www.stencilworx.co.za and if you want to place a very special order, e-mail Steve on info@stencilworx.co.za. Ladies, this hunk of a man is up for grabs so if you want to speak to Steve directly and book a date with him, you can contact him on +27 084 762 7803 (laughs). As an alternative, you can also find Stencilworx on Facebook.

Steve Erwin, the Wave Hunter